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What Gets Measured, Gets Done

What Gets Measured, Gets Done

For the past few months, my client, Rich, has been frustrated with a lack of exercise.  Between his kids’ schedules and running his own business, he just “couldn’t find the time” to walk, run, or simply attend to his fitness as much as she’d like.  For the past few months, my client, Rich, has been frustrated with a lack of exercise.  Between his kids’ schedules and running his own business, he just “couldn’t find the time” to walk, run, or simply attend to his fitness as much as she’d like.

His wife gave him a Fitbit for Fathers’ Day, thinking that it might spark a new perspective.  This little device has been a game changer for him and a clear testimony to the belief that “what gets measured, gets done.”

Within two weeks, he went from “I don’t have time” to “I’m not available then because I’ll be on my walk.”  Huh?  What happened to the excuses and justifications for not exercising?  They disappeared virtually overnight without profound change, but by simply putting measurement and/or metrics front and center.

This situation created a profound insight for him that started with a fundamental question: How do I get the most important things done?

Here’s what he discovered:

  1. Discern the 2-3 most important areas of life/work you’d like to improve (vision)
  2. Find an objective mechanism that allows you to measure current progress toward a goal or outcome (traction)
  3. Align your behavior and routine with what’s most important (healthy)

Implementing these three steps creates a level of focus that most folks will never achieve.  The best part – it’s just three, simple steps.

Since putting this structure in place, Rich has lost a few pounds, eats food that better supports health and energy, and makes time daily for exercise, regardless of how “busy” he might be.
I got my own Fitbit a few weeks ago.  It has more functions than I’ll ever use, but its ability to measure and track caloric input/output, sleep duration, and exercise has put me on a path to better health.

In the EOS world, a Fitbit is called a weekly Scorecard.  It forces a conversation to discern what’s most important (vs. irrelevant), to define an objective metric (vs. opinions), and aligns behavior with outcomes (vs. inconsistency).

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